Faculty Research Series

Upcoming Research Talks

2014-2015 Talks

"Impacts of the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Provision on Health-Related Outcomes of Young Adults"
Charles Courtemanche, Assistant Professor of Economics, Georgia State University
September 5, 2014, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Dr. Courtemanche is an Assistant Professor of Economics in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University.  He is a health economist and applied microeconomist with particular research interests in the economics of obesity, public policies to expand insurance coverage, and big box retailers.  His research has been published in a variety of journals including the Economic Journal, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Urban Economics, Journal of Economic History, and Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.  Dr. Courtemanche has previously been a faculty member at the University of Louisville and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  He is also a faculty research fellow in the Health Economics Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

"Voluntary International Climate Finance: The Strategic Consequences of Different Modes of Funding"
Reimund Schwarze, Head of Climate Economics, Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig, and Professor for International Environmental Economics, European University Viadrina (EUV), Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
September 19, 2014, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Dr. Schwarze received his PhD in economics from Technische Universität Berlin. In 1991, he accepted a position as a lecturer on environmental economics at Technische Universität Berlin, where he was promoted assistant professor in June 1995. In June 1998, he was awarded a one-year research fellowship at the Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. The focus of Dr. Schwarze’s research at Stanford was to examine legal and economic issues of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. In 2002, he assumed the position of a senior researcher in Berlin at the Economic Research Institute ― the largest of its kind in Germany ― where he was involved in designing the German National Allocation Plan for EU emissions trading. Since 2007, Dr. Schwarze has been at UFZ, coordinating economic research on climate change, and in 2011, he was elected Chair in International Environmental Economics at EUV. He is author of several books and journal papers on International Climate Change Policy, and has served as an environmental expert for the German Parliament and the German Ministry of Environmental Affairs. Dr. Schwarze also followed the international political negotiations of the UNFCCC as a political observer and government advisor in 2010 and 2011.

Patricia Anderson, Professor of Economics, Dartmouth College
September 26, 2014, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Patricia M. Anderson is Professor of Economics at Dartmouth and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA.  She received her BA Economics and Mathematics from William and Mary in 1985, and her PhD in Economics from Princeton in 1991.  Prof. Anderson’s research interests fall broadly in the field of applied microeconomics, with specific interests in child health & nutrition and in social insurance programs.  She is a Co-editor for the Journal of Human Resources and is on the Editorial Board for B.E. Journals in Economic Analysis and Policy.

Christopher Bryan, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of California, San Diego
October 10, 2014, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons


Christopher Bryan's research spans a range of theoretical interests and is driven by a core motivation to do research that enhances our understanding of and ability to address important real-world social, political, and policy problems. He is particularly interested in how subtle framing manipulations can change people’s attitudes and behavior in ways that benefit them, their communities and the larger society. A major theoretical theme of much of this work is the role of the self in influencing attitudes and behavior.

Benjamin Hansen, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Oregon
November 14, 2014, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Benjamin Hansen is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Oregon and a Faculty Research Fellow at the NBER. His research focuses on health, education and labortopics. Specifically, he researches factors influencing human capital accumulation, adolescent and adult risky behaviors, and crime.

"The Violation and Repair of Trust"
Peter Kim, Associate Professor, University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business
February 20, 2015, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Peter Kim studies the dynamics of interpersonal perceptions and their implications for work groups, negotiations, and dispute resolution. His research has been published in numerous scholarly journals, has received nine national or international awards, and has been featured by numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Washington Post, and National Public Radio. He serves on the editorial board of Organization Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Negotiation and Conflict Management Research. Professor Kim also serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Trust Research. He received a teaching award from Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management.

"The Politics of Pensions"
Sarah Anzia, Assistant Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley
March 20, 2015, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Sarah Anzia is a political scientist who studies American politics with a focus on state and local government, elections, interest groups, political parties, and public policy. Her recent book, Timing and Turnout: How Off-Cycle Elections Favor Organized Groups, examines how the timing of elections can be manipulated to affect both voter turnout and the composition of the electorate, which, in turn, affects election outcomes and public policy. She also studies the role of government employees and public sector unions in elections and policymaking in the U.S. In addition, she has written about the politics of public pensions, women in politics, the historical development of electoral institutions, and the power of political party leaders in state legislatures. Her work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, and American Studies in Political Development. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University and an M.P.P. from the Harris School at the University of Chicago.

Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, Associate Professor of Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University
April 3, 2015, 10:00am - 11:30am
Garrett Hall Commons

Economist Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach studies education policy, child health, and food consumption. Her recent work has focused on tracing the impact of major public policies, especially on children. She has investigated changes in student performance and other outcomes resulting from small-school and charter-school reform policies and from school accountability policies, such as the federal No Child Left Behind Act. In an innovative new study, she and her colleagues, including Raj Chetty of Harvard, are examining the life paths of almost 12,000 children who were randomly assigned to kindergarten classrooms in the 1980s as part of the Tennessee Project STAR experiment. Schanzenbach has also used Project STAR data to analyze the importance of classroom composition and class size on student outcomes. Her work on food stamps has measured how households alter their consumption of food and other goods when they receive food stamp benefits and whether increased benefits lead to improved health for recipients. Schanzenbach is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. From 2002 to 2004, she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of California, Berkeley. She was a faculty member at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago before joining Northwestern.

2013-2014 Talks

Global Food Security and Human Appropriation of Water Resources
Paolo D'Odorico, Professor of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia
September 20, 2013

Behavioral Responses to Increased Household Fuel Economy: Regression Discontinuity Evidence
Jonathan Meer, Assistant Professor of Economics, Texas A&M University
September 26, 2013

Student Loans, the Cost of Borrowing, and Implications for the Effectiveness of Need-Based Grant Aid
Lesley Turner, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Maryland
October 18, 2013

Motivational and Behavioral Crowding in Sustainable Development Interventions
Elisabeth Gerber, Professor, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan
November 15, 2013

Media Influences on Teen Sexual Behavior and Childbearing: The Impact of MTV's 16 and Pregnant
Phillip Levine, Professor of Economics, Wellesley College
November 22, 2013

The Politics of Pensions
Sarah Anzia, Assistant Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley
February 14, 2014 -- CANCELLED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER; TO BE RESCHEDULED 

Self-Control in School-Age Children
Angela Duckworth, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania
March 7, 2014

Learning the Ropes: Task Specific Experience and the Output of Idaho State Troopers
Emily Owens, Associate Professor Criminology, University of Pennsylvania
March 28, 2014, 9:30am - 11:00am

Sociotechnical Imaginaries as Policy Levers: An Analysis of US and EU Telecommunications Policy Trajectories from the 70's till the Present
Tolu Odumosu, Assistant Professor of Science Technology and Society, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia
April 11, 2014

Regulating Consumer Financial Products: Evidence from Credit Cards
Neale Mahoney, Assistant Professor of Economics and Robert King Steel Faculty Fellow, University of Chicago, Booth School of Business
April 25, 2014

2012-2013 Talks

Democratic Competition and Citizens' Preferences: An Uneasy Tension?
Jamie Druckman, Payson S. Wild Professor of Poltical Science and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University
April 26, 2013

Rucker Johnson, Associate Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley
Rescheduling for fall 2013

Americans Fill Out President Obama's Census Form: What is His Race?
Jack Citrin, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
March 4, 2013

The Imprisoner's Dilemma: A Cost Benefit Approach to Incarceration
David Abrams, Assistant Professor of Law, Business Economics, and Public Policy, University of Pennsylvania Law School
February 15, 2013

Pay-What-You-Want and Non-Selfish Behavior in Markets
Ayelet Gneezy, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Rady School of Management, University of California, San Diego
February 1. 2013

Price Subsdies, Diagnostic Tests, and Targeting of Malaria Treatment: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial
Pascaline Dupas, Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford University
December 6, 2012

Exploring Variation in State Fiscal Shock during the Great Recession
Andrea Campbell, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
November 1, 2012

Behavioral Responses to Teacher Transfer Incentives: Results from a Randomized Experiment
Steven Glazerman, Senior Fellow at Mathematica Policy Research
September 24, 2012

Incentivizing Educational Investment: The Impact of Performance-Based Scholarships on Student Use of Time
Cecilia Rouse, Lawrence and Shirley Katzman and Lewis and Anna Ernst Professor in the Economics of Education, Princeton University
September 10, 2012